Montesquieu

Charles-Louis de Secondat, Baron de la Brède et de Montesquieu

The Spirit of Laws [De l'Esprit des Lois]

First Published in 1748. Translated from the French in 1752 by Thomas Nugent. Based on an Public Domain Edition Published in 1914 by G. Bell & Sons Ltd. London

 

Preface

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Book I. Of Laws in General

Book II. Of Laws Directly Derived from the Nature of Government

Book III. Of the Principles of the Three Kinds of Government

Book IV. That the Laws of Education Ought to Be in Relation to the Principles of Government

Book V. That the Laws Given by the Legislator Ought to Be in Relation to the Principles of Government

Book VI. Consequences of the Principles of Different Governments with Respect to the Simplicity of Civil and Criminal Laws, the Form of Judgments, and the Inflicting of Punishments

Book VII. Consequences of the Different Principles of the Three Governments with Respect to Sumptuary Laws, Luxury, and the Condition of Women

Book VIII. Of the Corruption of the Principles of the Three Governments

Book IX. Of Laws in the Relation They Bear to a Defensive Force

Book X. Of Laws in the Relation They Bear to Offensive Force

 

Book XI. Of the Laws Which Establish Political Liberty, with Regard to the Constitution

Book XII. Of the Laws That Form Political Liberty, in Relation to the Subject

Book XIII. Of the Relation Which the Levying of Taxes and the Greatness of the Public Revenues Bear to Liberty

Book XIV. Of Laws in Relation to the Nature of the Climate

Book XV. In What Manner the Laws of Civil Slavery Relate to the Nature of the Climate

Book XVI. How the Laws of Domestic Slavery Bear a Relation to the Nature of the Climate

Book XVII. How the Laws of Political Servitude Bear a Relation to the Nature of the Climate

Book XVIII. Of Laws in the Relation They Bear to the Nature of the Soil

Book XIX. Of Laws in Relation to the Principles Which Form the General Spirit, Morals, and Customs of a Nation

Book XX. Of Laws in Relation to Commerce, Considered in its Nature and Distinctions

 

Book XXI. Of Laws in Relation to Commerce, Considered in the Revolutions It Has Met With in the World

Book XXII. Of Laws in Relation to the Use of Money

Book XXIII. Of Laws in the Relation They Bear to the Number of Inhabitants

Book XXIV. Of Laws in Relation to Religion, Considered in Itself, and in Its Doctrine

Book XXV. Of Laws in Relation to the Establishment of Religion and its External Polity

Book XXVI. Of Laws in Relation to the Order of Things Which They Determine

Book XXVII. Of the Origin and Revolutions of the Roman Laws on Successions

Book XXVIII. Of the Origin and Revolutions of the Civil Laws among the French

Book XXIX. Of the Manner of Composing Laws

Book XXX. Theory of the Feudal Laws among the Franks in the Relation They Bear to the Establishment of the Monarchy

Book XXXI. Theory of the Feudal Laws among the Franks, in the Relation They Bear to the Revolutions of their Monarchy